How They Judge Us

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How They Judge Us

Source: http://thepositivitysolution.com/judging-others/

Source: http://thepositivitysolution.com/judging-others/

Source: http://thepositivitysolution.com/judging-others/

Source: http://thepositivitysolution.com/judging-others/

By Annette Chu, Editor-in-Chief

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People tend to judge themselves and others in many ways. However, judging someone based on what you see can form an incorrect image, but people still do it. As a result, it can make a person insecure when socializing, because they don’t want the other person to see them negatively.

 

How Others See You

Many students know how others perceive them. Sophomore Devanie Perez said, “I think

[I am viewed] as an outgoing student for being involved in so many school activities, like clubs. I also have heard students say they look up to me for being in such advanced classes meanwhile only being a sophomore. Not only this but I am somewhat of a clown, so first impressions range between them believing that I’m either mean or crazy.”

Junior Sigrid Real-Aguilar said, “A lot think I’m bi or a tomboy because of the way I dress. I often wear basketball shorts because it feels comfortable, but even some of my friends thought that about me. High school is based off your reputation, and some kids spread rumors about you and suddenly everyone thinks that about you.”

Junior Kiana Ramirez said, “I’m pretty normal academically, but when it comes to club involvement, their perspectives tend to change towards my academics because suddenly it’s not just my studies I’m balancing. I have seen the difference, however, when it comes to my male peers, as they subconsciously don’t expect too much out of me. This is because my social group tends to be the kids who take more APs and honors, so when we’re compared to each other, the standards are a bit higher, so when they see I’m taking four APs, it just becomes our norm.”

 

Self-Judgement

Students at Miami High judge themselves for different reasons. Sophomore Rolando Morales said, “I judge myself extremely harsh, not because of others, but because I want to better myself.” Senior Katherine Ramirez-Lopez said, “I judge myself based off the people I surround myself because I admire and look up to them.

Senior Tais Polo said, “The lack of friends I have does influence the way I perceive myself. I always want to come off as sweet and kind, but I’m very critical, which can come off as aggressive. I also lack confidence because of my inability to make a lot of friends, which results in the questioning of my worth as a person.

Sophomore Devanie Perez said, “I think [people judge me] as an outgoing student for being involved in so many school activities, like clubs. I also have heard students say they look up to me for being in such advanced classes while only being a sophomore.”

Judging when Socializing

Knowing that there is a possibility people are judging you can affect how you socialize with others. Junior Ashley Delgado said, “It makes it hard for me to start or keep a conversation going for people I’ve just met.” Kiana Ramirez said, “It makes it difficult to approach others when people already have an opinion about you based on what they know about your report card. They expect you to fit some stereotype of never going out or having fun or knowing how to socialize.”

However, some students are not affected by others’ opinions. Senior Carlos Lopez said, “I don’t have a bad reputation or gossip associated with my name. Every new person I tend to talk to knows very little of me, so I’m not worried about whatever thoughts they might already hold.”

Katherine Ramirez-Lopez said, “I can go up and talk to people without a problem, and I’m always within the same friend group constantly. My social life is pretty healthy as I’m involved in multiple clubs, where I have to be social and talk to a lot of people.”

 

Administrators

Some students might talk to teachers and counselors if they feel insecure. English teacher Ms. Zamora said that different types of people come to her for many different reasons. “They come to me about everything; however, I think most students lack the self-consciousness to tell me they feel that way, but they communicate it through different ways,” she said. “I like to talk through why they feel whatever they’re feeling, but it depends on the kid and what they need.”

11th grade counselor Ms. Gottlieb said that students do come to her, and the two main reasons are usually because of weight and skin condition. “A lot of the time skin condition issues come from PE classes, so I talk to the teacher to make adjustment to the uniform. I also talk to them about learning how to accept themselves for who they are.”

 

Senior Tais Polo said, “I only change the ways I can offer respect and kindness, but I will never change my morality, even if it prevents me from making more friends because I have people now who love me more for those same aspects.”

 

Changing Yourself

Sometimes people want to change themselves when they hear others’ opinions of them. Rolando Morales said, “I have a lot of flaws, and I do want to work on them. I take the negative criticism from other students as reasons why I should better myself. I take it as motivation.”

However, there are some students who don’t care about what others think. Devanie Perez said, “I think I’ve reached a really good point in my life where I have met amazing friends, I feel confident in myself, and I am just simply happy with how my life has been going.”

Tais Polo said, “I learned that there are people who are willing to surround themselves with emotionally intelligent people. I pride myself on being empathetic and understanding. I always strive to be that, even in a disagreement. I also feel that no matter how much a sweet, kind person you are, there will be people who will hate you for it, and that’s OK. Therefore, I only change the ways I can offer respect and kindness, but I will never change my morality, even if it prevents me from making more friends because I have people now who love me more for those same aspects.”

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